<h2>Background</h2>

The five-mile-long stretch of Dauphin Island Parkway/State Highway 163 – South inside the city limits of Mobile, Alabama is a true peninsula – a landmass bordered on three sides by water. Once off I-10’s Exit 22-B, the waters of Mobile Bay lie just to the east while to the west and south Dog River flows towards its convergence into the Bay.

The first 3.5 miles of this Peninsula portion of DIP is a mixture of commercial and residential properties that dwindle into primarily residential and sensitive, tidally influenced marshes and flats where the brackish water of the Bay meets the fresh waters of Perch Creek and Dog River.

Throughout the community are six creeks and streams that meander their way to the River, the largest being Perch Creek whose headwaters begin over two miles upstream. Around the 4.5 mile marker, the Creek connects to the River on the west and McNally Park to the east is also home to two launches into the Dog River Scenic Blueway.  Further, this area is where cyclists move from the bay-side “Crepe Myrtle Trail” to the western “Dog River Loop”.

The Peninsula of Mobile’s Project #189, aimed at creating a recreational destination point at the south end of the peninsula, can be found in the Alabama Coastal Restoration Project Suggestion Portal.  It is tied to the City’s Wetland Acquisition Program designed for preservation and Project 234, the 2.4 million dollar Expansion of Helen Wood Park and Preserve.  These projects can be viewed by visiting
https://research.dcnr.alabama.gov/ACR/ProjectView.aspx?projectID=234

Learn more about Dog River’s Scenic Blueway Trail by visiting www.dogriver.org
and the bigger national Blueway Initiative.


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<h2>Background</h2>

The five-mile-long stretch of Dauphin Island Parkway/State Highway 163 – South inside the city limits of Mobile, Alabama is a true peninsula – a landmass bordered on three sides by water. Once off I-10’s Exit 22-B, the waters of Mobile Bay lie just to the east while to the west and south Dog River flows towards its convergence into the Bay.

The first 3.5 miles of this Peninsula portion of DIP is a mixture of commercial and residential properties that dwindle into primarily residential and sensitive, tidally influenced marshes and flats where the brackish water of the Bay meets the fresh waters of Perch Creek and Dog River.

Throughout the community are six creeks and streams that meander their way to the River, the largest being Perch Creek whose headwaters begin over two miles upstream. Around the 4.5 mile marker, the Creek connects to the River on the west and McNally Park to the east is also home to two launches into the Dog River Scenic Blueway.  Further, this area is where cyclists move from the bay-side “Crepe Myrtle Trail” to the western “Dog River Loop”.

The Peninsula of Mobile’s Project #189, aimed at creating a recreational destination point at the south end of the peninsula, can be found in the Alabama Coastal Restoration Project Suggestion Portal.  It is tied to the City’s Wetland Acquisition Program designed for preservation and Project 234, the 2.4 million dollar Expansion of Helen Wood Park and Preserve.  These projects can be viewed by visiting
https://research.dcnr.alabama.gov/ACR/ProjectView.aspx?projectID=234

Learn more about Dog River’s Scenic Blueway Trail by visiting www.dogriver.org
and the bigger national Blueway Initiative.


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